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Concord Imaging Center

At CIC, we remove the anxiety and focus on you.

Our advanced technology, highly-trained staff of board certified radiologists, and comfortable, patient-focused imaging centers give you peace of mind—and the confidence that you're receiving the best care available.

So you can feel more comfortable, and less anxious.

 

Making Strides

Three new doctors at CIC
Now offereing 3d breast imaging
 

News

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Arthrography
What is Bone Densitometry
What is Mammography
What is Breast MRI
What is Breast Ultrasound
What is Image-guided Breast Biopsy
What is a CT Scan
What is Hysterosalpingography
What is an Intravenous Pyelogram (IVP)
What is an MRI
What is an Open MRI
What is an Ultrasound
What is an X-ray

Arthrography

See procedure : Arthrography
An arthrogram is the examination of a joint using X-ray. The most common areas studied include the shoulder, knee, or hip. During the examination, the radiologist, a physician who specializes in medical diagnosis through X-ray, injects a special dye (contrast medium) into the joint space while watching with the X-ray machine. An X-ray technologist will assist in the exam.

What you can expect during the arthrogram?
The technologist will bring you to the exam room. The procedure will be explained to you and you will be asked to sign a consent form. You will typically lie on your back on the X-ray exam table. The area around your joint will be washed with antiseptic soap and covered with a sterile drape or towel. The radiologist will use a small needle to numb (anesthetize) the area being examined. A special needle is then inserted into the joint space and the X-ray dye is administered. This dye will coat the structures of the joint making them visible under X-ray. The radiologist will remove the needle. Then he or she will ask you to hold various positions while X-ray films are taken.

What happens after my arthrogram?
Your joint may feel tight or slightly painful after the exam. This is normal and should not be cause for concern. Moving or exercising the joint will help this feeling to pass. If you experience prolonged pain following the exam you should contact your doctor.
Depending on your doctor,

  • A CT scan or MRI may follow your arthrogram
  • Your doctor may leave other instructions for you to follow relative to your health history


The radiologist will study your test and provide your doctor with a detailed report.
Your physician will then discuss the results with you.

Locations:
CIC Pillsbury

Bone Densitometry

See procedure: Bone Densitometry
Bone densitometry, also called dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), bone densitometry is an enhanced form of X-ray technology used to measure bone mineral density (BMD). The DXA machine uses a thin, invisible beam of low-dose X-rays with two distinct energy peaks. One peak is absorbed mainly by soft tissue and the other by bone. The soft tissue amount is subtracted from the total and what remains is a patient's BMD.

A Bone densitometry test can also assess your risk for developing fractures. If your bone density is found to be low, you and your physician can work together on a treatment plan to help prevent fractures before they occur. This test can also track the effects of treatment for osteoporosis and other conditions that cause bone loss.

How is bone densitometry (DXA) performed?
Bone densitometry is a simple, non-invasive procedure performed on an outpatient basis. The study is usually completed in 10 to 30 minutes, depending on the body parts examined. Typically, the lower back and hips are measured.

The patient lies on a padded examination table and remains still for a short time while the arm of the machine passes over their body taking measurements. It is important that you stay as still as possible during the procedure to ensure a clear and useful image. The procedure is painless and radiation exposure is minimal.

What is osteoporosis?
Osteoporosis is a condition of reduced bone mass that often affects women after menopause, but may also be found in men. It involves a gradual loss of calcium, causing the bones to become thinner, more fragile and more likely to break. Fortunately, this bone loss is detectable and treatable. Testing for osteoporosis is performed with a DXA scanner and is quick, safe, and non-invasive.

Preparation:
You may eat normally on the day of the exam, but do not take calcium supplements for at least 24 hours beforehand. Wear loose, comfortable clothing, avoiding garments that have zippers, belts, or buttons made of metal.

Inform your physician if you have recently had a barium examination or have been injected with a contrast material for a computed tomography (CT) scan or radioisotope scan; you may have to wait 10 to 14 days before undergoing a DXA test.

Location :
CIC Breast Imaging Suite

Resources:
Download bone densitometry details document

Mammography

See procedure : Breast Imaging

Imaging of the breast is performed via multiple modalities including mammography (X-ray), ultrasound and MRI. While mammography is the mainstay of breast imaging, ultrasound and MRI are used in specific instances with each modality used to guide biopsies of the breast.

What is mammography?
Mammography is a specific type of X-ray for the examination of breasts. It is used as a screening tool for the detection of abnormalities in the breast tissue. Research has shown that annual mammograms lead to early detection of breast cancers, when they are most curable and breast-conservation therapies are available.

While mammography is the best screening tool for breast cancer available today, mammograms do not detect all breast cancers, and may possibly indicate cancer when it is not present (called a false-positive result).

What are the advantages of digital mammography?
A digital mammogram differs from film mammography in that it uses a special detector to capture and convert X-ray energy into a digital image.

The Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST) showed that for the entire population of women studied, digital and film mammography have similar screening accuracy. However, digital mammography has been shown to be more accurate in women under 50 years old, and in women with dense breast tissues.

An additional advantage of digital over film mammography is that the technologist can immediately assess the quality of the digital image rather than waiting for the film to be processed. This greatly reduces your time in the mammography unit and improves patient comfort.

What should I expect during my mammogram?
During mammography, a specially qualified technologist will position your breast in the digital mammography unit. Your breast(s) will be placed on a special platform and compressed with a paddle. Although this may be uncomfortable, it should not be painful and will last only seconds. The breast must be compressed while the X-ray is taken in order to get the best image detail.

Digital Breast Mammogram Preparation:
Refrain from using powder, cream, or deodorant on your breasts or under your arms on the day of the examination. Try to schedule the mammogram during the time of the month that your breasts are least sensitive. Wear a comfortable two-piece outfit to your appointment.

If you have had prior mammograms at another hospital please bring them with you. If you do not have copies of your prior mammograms, let us know and we will request them for you.

What is breast MRI?
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the breast has become an extremely helpful tool in evaluating mammogram abnormalities and identifying early breast cancers, especially in women at high risk. Its ability to better determine the extent of the breast cancer has assisted in surgical management so that breast conserving therapies can be considered.

What should I expect during my breast MRI?
Although MRI is an advanced medical technique, the exam itself is relatively easy and comfortable for most people. The technologist will escort you to a changing room and then to a consultation room where you will be asked a series of screening questions prior to the MRI evaluation. The procedure usually takes between 15 to 30 minutes but typically longer if a biopsy is scheduled. You will be asked to lie on your stomach on a specialized cushioned table with your breasts in an imaging coil. Once you are in a comfortable position, the table will move into the magnet. From the control area, the technologist will stay in constant contact with you, both visually and through an intercom.

What is Imaging-Guided Breast Biopsy?
A biopsy refers to a procedure in which a sample of the tissue within the breast is obtained, in most cases using a needle. The type of procedure and image guidance is selected to optimize the sampling success while keeping in mind your comfort. During a stereotactic or MRI-guided biopsy, you will lie on your stomach with your breast positioned through an aperture in the table. During an ultrasound-guided biopsy or needle localization, you will lie on either your back or side.  Mammography-guided needle localizations are typically performed while you sit in a chair. The procedure lasts about an hour and there is no significant scarring. After your biopsy, a physician who specializes in analyzing tissue under a microscope will prepare a report which will be reviewed and forwarded to your physician. Normally the results are available to you in one or two days.

How does image-guided biopsy and needle localization work?
An image-guided biopsy of the breast may be performed with ultrasound, X-ray (stereotactic) or MRI guidance. The type of procedure and image guidance is selected to optimize the sampling success while keeping in mind your comfort.

What should I expect during an image-guided biopsy?
The technologist will escort you to a changing room and then to the procedural or consultation room. The procedure will be explained in detail and a series of screening questions asked. You will be asked to sign a consent form. Prior to the procedure, the radiologist will meet with you to answer any questions or concerns you may have. The procedure usually takes between 30 and 60 minutes but sometimes longer depending on the image guidance and the number of sites targeted.


What is breast ultrasound?
Ultrasound of the breast uses reflected sound waves to view and produce pictures of the internal structures of the breast. It is often used to determine whether a mammographic finding or breast lump is filled with fluid (a cyst) or a solid structure.

What should I expect during the breast ultrasound?
Your breast ultrasound will be performed by a specially trained sonographer. You may be asked to change into a gown for the procedure. You will need to remove all jewelry from around your neck.

A special gel will be applied to your breast to improve the transmission of the sound waves. The transducer is placed against your breast and moved back and forth. The test usually takes between 15 and 30 minutes but can sometimes take longer. Additional time may be needed if a biopsy is also scheduled. After the examination, a radiologist will review your study and discuss the findings with you.

Breast Ultrasound Preparation:
Wear an outfit that makes it easy to undress above the waist, such as a two-piece outfit.

Location:
CIC Breast Imaging Suite

Resources:
Download the mammography details document
Download the breast ultrasound details document

CT Scan

See procedure : CT Scan
A CT scan is the process of creating cross-sectional images of any part of the body. During the exam, a thin X-ray beam scans multiple points around the periphery of the body part. A computer then reconstructs the data creating two-dimensional X-ray images or "slices." CT examinations compliment other imaging exams such as X-ray films by offering physicians an additional tool in which to view anatomy. In some cases, CT provides diagnostic information that cannot be achieved with any other method.

What can I expect when I have my CT scan?
The technologist will bring you into the CT scan room where the procedure will be explained to you. The technologist will help you onto the cushioned table. As the procedure begins, you will hear a whirring sound as the X-ray tube moves in the machine. The table will move slightly as each picture is taken. To obtain the best possible images, it is important that you lie very still during the exam.

Depending on the type of examination you are having, you may receive an intravenous (IV) injection of contrast material (X-ray dye). Sometimes scans are performed prior to receiving X-ray dye and then repeated after the dye is a given. In either case, the technologist will explain each step of the examination.

The technologist will communicate with you during your exam through a microphone. You may be given "breathing" instructions during your exam. Scan times depend on the type of exam and number of body parts imaged, but typically are less than 30 minutes. If you are having a biopsy during your CT scan, you will be asked to sign a consent form. This type of exam is more involved and therefore may last more than 30 minutes.

Preparation:
If you are receiving IV X-ray dye and are allergic to any medications, or have had a previous allergic reaction to X-ray dye, please tell your doctor, the radiologist, or the technologist.

Do not eat or drink anything for two hours before your exam. If you take medications, ask your doctor if you should take them before your CT scan. Any medication should be taken with a small sip of water. If you are having an examination of your abdomen or pelvis, you will be given a flavored drink to outline your intestines and stomach.

Abdomen
No solid food two hours prior to test. Physician will instruct you to drink one bottle of "Redi-Cat" (barium suspension) 30 minutes prior to exam.

Abdomen & pelvis
No solid food two hours prior to test. Physician will instruct you to drink two bottles of "Redi-Cat" (barium suspension) two hours prior to exam.

Hematuria
No solid food two hours prior to exam.

Brain
No solid food two hours prior to exam.

Chest
No solid food two hours prior to exam.

Sinuses, cardiac scoring, and spine
No preparation needed

Locations :
CIC Horseshoe Pond
CIC Pillsbury

Resources:
Download the CT scan details document

Hysterosalpingography

See procedure : Hysterosalpingography
Hysterosalpingography (HSG) is a fluoroscopic X-ray study of a woman's uterus and fallopian tubes. It involves insertion of a catheter into the cervix and instillation of a water soluble contrast material into the uterus and fallopian tubes.

Any woman who is pregnant, or thinks she might be, should let her doctor know before proceeding with the exam.

What to expect during the HSG exam
The obstetrician/gynecologist performs the study with fluoroscopic assistance from the radiologist. The study usually is completed within 30 minutes.

While lying on the X-ray table the obstetrician/gynecologist will place a speculum into the vagina, clean the cervix, and then insert a catheter into the cervix. The speculum is then removed. Contrast material is then slowly instilled to fill the uterine cavity, fallopian tubes and peritoneal cavity. As this occurs, fluoroscopic X-ray images are taken. These images are promptly reviewed and the catheter removed.

What happens after an HSG procedure?
The radiologist and obstetrician/gynecologist will study your exam. Your doctor will discuss these results with you and explain what they mean in relation to your health.

There may be slight discomfort and cramping when the catheter is placed and contrast material injected, but it should not last long. There may also be slight generalized lower abdominal pain, but this should also be minimal and not long lasting. Most women experience vaginal spotting for a few days after the examination, which is normal.

Preparation:
Generally there is no special preparation needed for this test. However, prior to the procedure you may take an anti-inflammatory medication (Aleve or Motrin).

Locations:
CIC Pillsbury

Intravenous Pyelogram (IVP)

See procedure : Intravenous Pyelogram (IVP)

An intravenous pyelogram (IVP) or intravenous urogram (IVU) is an X-ray study of
the kidneys, ureters and urinary bladder. The study uses an X-ray dye to enhance the
X-ray images. The contrast material is injected into a vein (usually where the elbow
bends). As its progress through the urinary tract, it is recorded on a series of quickly
captured X-rays. The exam enables the radiologist to review the anatomy and the
function of the kidneys and urinary tract.

What should I expect during my IVP exam?
You will be positioned on an exam table and asked to hold your breath as X-ray equipment moves over you. Several X-rays may be taken during the course of the study. During the imaging process you may be asked to turn from side to side and to hold several different positions to enable the radiologist to capture views from several angles. Near the end of the exam you may be asked to empty your bladder so that an additional film can be taken of your urinary bladder after it empties.

The contrast material used for IVP studies will NOT discolor your urine or cause any discomfort when you urinate. If you experience such symptoms after your IVP exam, let your doctor know right away.

If you had a previous allergic reaction to IV X-ray dye, please tell your doctor, the radiologist or the technologist. Your doctor will need to prescribe medications to be taken the day before and day of the scan.

Locations:
CIC Pillsbury

Resources:
Download the intravenous pyelogram (IVP) details document

MRI

See procedure : MRI

MRI is one of the most significant advances in medical imaging. It allows physicians to see inside the human body with remarkable detail. MRI does not use X-rays to create images. Instead, it combines magnetic fields with radio waves and uses specially designed computers to produce detailed images of internal body structures. While X-rays may be best for showing bones, doctors use MRI to examine "soft" tissue such as muscle, nerves, cartilage, ligaments, tendons, vertebral discs, and various internal organs.

What happens during MRI?
Although MRI is an advanced medical technique, the exam itself is relatively easy and comfortable for most people. You will be asked to lie on a cushioned table. A device called an imaging coil will be placed over or under you. When you are comfortably positioned, the table will move into the magnet. From the control area, the technologist will stay in constant contact with you, both visually and through an intercom.
As the exam begins you will hear a variety of muffled thumping or clicking sounds. These sounds are normal during the exam and should not be cause for concern. Other than the muted sounds you will hear, MRI produces no bodily sensations.

How long will the exam take?
Exams take anywhere from 30 to 60 minutes depending on your particular procedure.

Preparation :
The day of your exam, it is best to wear loose, comfortable clothing such as a sweatshirt and sweatpants. If possible, avoid clothing with metallic objects such as zippers, snaps and grommets as metal may interfere with the imaging process. If you must wear clothing with metal, hospital gowns will be provided. Make-up and hairsprays should also be avoided.

Before your test, you will be asked to remove all metallic objects, such as eyeglasses, jewelry, wristwatches, etc.

There are no restrictions of foods prior to your MRI. You should however, avoid coffee and other caffeinated beverages since you will be required to lie still for several minutes at a time.

Depending on the type of exam you will be having, you may receive an injection of contrast material (similar to X-ray dye). If you are allergic to any medications, have had a previous allergic reaction to X-ray dye, are diabetic, or have renal disease, please tell your doctor, the radiologist or the technologist.

MRI Abdomen
Nothing by mouth eight hours prior to exam.

MRA Abdomen
Nothing by mouth eight hours prior to exam.

MRI Pelvis
Nothing by mouth eight hours prior to exam.

All other MRI procedures
No preparation needed

Locations:
CIC Pillsbury

Resources:
Download the MRI details document

Open MRI

See procedure : Open MRI

Over the years, there has been an ongoing stigma surrounding traditional MRI units that elicits fear, agitation, and stress in some patients. This response is typically the result of the small, "tunnel-like" opening that allows for high-field strength. High field strength is necessary to enhance picture quality and achieves shorter exam times.

Because the traditional high-field MRI units have a small opening, many young patients and those who are claustrophobic, large-framed, or obese have difficulty completing their exams due to discomfort.

When Open MRI units were first introduced as a solution to this problem, the technology lacked the level of image quality and accuracy to which doctors and patients had grown accustomed. With a larger opening, the field strength of the magnet had to be markedly reduced, which created longer scan times and lower quality images.

Today, technologically advanced high-field Open MRI units provide patients and physicians the best of both worlds — superior strength with a wide opening designed for patient comfort. This advanced technology allows for faster imaging and higher quality images of all parts of the body.

In addition to providing the better imaging, the high-field Open MRI also maximizes the comfort level for patients, especially:

• Children
• Claustrophobic
• Obese
• Seniors

The spacious and airy design of our unique machine helps to ease claustrophobia and enhance the patient experience. Any patient can be scanned with a family member or friend by his or her side.

Locations:
CIC Epsom
CIC Pillsbury

Resources:
Download the MRI details document

Ultrasound

See procedure : Ultrasound
Ultrasound (also called sonography) is a diagnostic medical procedure that uses high-frequency sound waves to produce dynamic visual images of organs.

There are many advantages to imaging the body with ultrasound. Most importantly, there is no ionizing radiation as with X-rays – which is why ultrasound is used during pregnancy. Furthermore, soft tissues, such as the liver, spleen, kidneys and pancreas can be imaged directly without the injection of any sort of radio-opaque substances
(X-ray dye or contrast) to make them visible.

First introduced to the medical world in the 1960s, ultrasound has quickly become one of the most widely used diagnostic imaging modalities.

What are the different types of ultrasound?

Abdominal ultrasound
An abdominal ultrasound can include examination of the liver, gallbladder, biliary ducts, spleen, pancreas, kidneys, and aorta.

OB/GYN ultrasound
This type of exam may be done for pregnancy diagnosis, amniocentesis, ectopic pregnancy, fetal age determination, placenta localization, IUD localization, and pelvic and urinary bladder examinations.

Miscellaneous ultrasounds
Miscellaneous ultrasounds may be done for breasts, testes, chest, parathyroid, thyroid, pylorus (stomach), appendix, tendons, and neonatal (abdomen or kidneys).

What should I expect during my ultrasound?
The technologist will bring you to the exam room where the procedure will be explained to you. If you are having a biopsy during your ultrasound, you will be asked to sign a consent form.

You will be instructed to lie on the padded ultrasound bed for the exam. The technologist will apply a special gel to your skin and/or to the imaging instrument. This gel is essential to the imaging process. You will be given a towel to clean the gel from your skin when the exam is completed.

For certain OB/GYN exams, your physician or the radiologist may request a trans-vaginal ultrasound. During this exam you will be asked to place a special instrument as you would place a tampon. The radiologist or technologist performing the exam will then obtain the required images. You may experience some discomfort as the instrument is moved. Any discomfort should be mentioned immediately to the radiologist or technologist.

Preparation:
Instructions specific to your exam will be provided to you from your doctor, or the scheduling department at Concord Hospital (guidelines are listed below). Be sure to follow all instructions carefully to ensure a quality exam. Failure to do so may result in a poor quality exam and/or a delay in performing your exam. Many of the miscellaneous ultrasounds require no preparation.

Abdomen (liver, gallbladder, spleen, or aorta)
Nothing by mouth eight hours before the exam.

Pelvis
Drink 32oz non-carbonated liquid one hour prior.

Kidneys (renal)
Nothing by mouth for four hours prior (unless specified).

Kidneys & bladder
Nothing by mouth for four hours prior (unless specified). Drink 32oz non-carbonated liquid one hour prior.

Bladder
Drink 32oz non-carbonated liquid one hour prior.

Amniocentesis
Drink 24oz non-carbonated liquid one hour prior.

Obstetrical (OB, pregnancy)
Less than 12 wks - 1st trimester: Drink 32oz non-carbonated liquid one hour prior.
More than 12 wks - 2nd & 3rd trimester: Drink 24oz non-carbonated liquid one hour prior.

Biophysical profile
Drink 20oz non-carbonated liquid one hour prior.

Scrotal (testicular), spine, thyroid, and breast
No preparation needed

Locations :
CIC Horseshoe Pond
CIC Pillsbury

Resources:
Download the ultrasound details document

X-ray

See procedure : X-ray

Diagnostic X-ray (also called plain film or radiography) is an examination using electromagnetic energy beams to produce images onto film or a computer.

What is fluoroscopy?
Fluoroscopy is a form of X-ray imaging that enables the radiologist to visualize real time movie-like images of an organ or area of concern. It is commonly used to evaluate the gastrointestinal system, but also used in procedures such as arthrography, hysterosalpingograms and lumbar punctures.

What is X-ray dye?
X-ray dye, also known as contrast dye or medium, is a solution that is used to accentuate specific structures when looking at an image.

In X-ray and CT studies, the contrast dye is any internally administered substance that has a different density from soft tissue. Having a different density than soft tissues means the X-ray interacts in such a way that provides "contrast" between adjacent structures. This allows the radiologist to see anatomy more clearly.

MRI contrast works differently, but also accentuates the differences between tissues. The MRI contrast alters the magnetic properties of tissue allowing the radiologist to better characterize tissues and see anatomy more clearly.

What if I am allergic to contrast dye?
Today there is a low incidence of reaction to contrast. For X-ray and CT studies, we use state-of-the-art "non-ionic" contrast media which further reduces the risk of reaction. However, the following factors have been identified as increasing the risk for a contrast medium reaction:

• History of reaction to contrast agents
• Asthma or severe allergies
• Sickle cell anemia
• Multiple myeloma, renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus

Contrast reactions range from mild (nausea, peculiar taste in mouth) to severe (respiratory and/or cardiac arrest). If you have a history of contrast reaction, talk to your doctor about taking medication to pre-treat your allergy prior to the procedure.

If you are allergic to any medications, or have had a previous allergic reaction to X-ray dye, please tell your doctor, the radiologist or the technologist. Your doctor will need to prescribe medications to be taken the day before and day of the exam.

Any woman who is pregnant, or thinks she might be, should let her doctor know before proceeding with an X-ray or fluoroscopy exam.

What is contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN)?
Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is a form of acute renal failure that is caused by exposure to contrast media during image-guided cardiology and radiology procedures.

What is nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF)?
Neprhogenic systemic fibrosis is a rare and serious syndrome that involves fibrosis of skin, joints, eyes, and internal organs. Its cause is not fully understood, but it seems to be associated with exposure to MRI contrast medium in patients with severe kidney failure. If you are scheduled to receive MRI contrast, you will be pre-screened with questions and if needed laboratory studies to determine your risk.

What is an arthrogram?
An arthrogram is the examination of a joint using contrast dye. The most common areas studied include the shoulder, knee, and hip. During the examination, the radiologist injects a contrast medium into the joint space while watching with the X-ray machine. Depending on the study, a CT scan or MRI may follow your arthrogram.

What is an intravenous pyelogram (IVP)?
An intravenous pyelogram (IVP) or intravenous urogram (IVU) is an X-ray study of the kidneys, ureters and urinary bladder. The study uses an X-ray dye to enhance the X-ray images. The contrast material is injected into a vein (usually where the elbow bends). As its progress through the urinary tract, it is recorded on a series of quickly captured X-rays. The exam enables the radiologist to review the anatomy and the function of the kidneys and urinary tract.

Locations:
CIC Epsom
CIC Horseshoe Pond
CIC Pillsbury

Resources:
Download the X-ray details document: What is X-ray dye?